Dental FAQs

Why should I have my pet's teeth cleaned?
In the last 20 years improvements in dental health have made a tremendous impact on the longevity and quality of life of our pets. Regular dental cleaning helps to prevent heart disease, bronchitis, liver and kidney infections. But the thing most pet owners appreciate more than anything else is that their pet's breath smells BETTER!

How often should I have my pet's teeth cleaned?
A professional dental cleaning done once or twice per year after your pet reaches 2-3 years of age makes a definite positive impact on your pet's quality of life.

What happens when my pet has its teeth cleaned at your clinic?
We will anesthetize your pet in order to effectively clean all surfaces of the teeth. We use an ultrasonic dental scaler to do the cleaning which causes little discomfort to the mouth. Once the teeth are cleaned we evaluate the teeth in order to determine whether any extractions should be performed. If no extractions are necessary, we will then polish the teeth. At the start of dental cleaning we administer an antibiotic if your pet is not currently taking antibiotics. We do not give pain injections after a dental unless there have been extractions performed.

Why would you want to extract a tooth?
We recommend extracting teeth for any of the following reasons: broken teeth which expose the tooth pulp; severe periodontal disease where the tooth and its root are diseased; cavities in dogs or resorptive lesions in cats; tooth root abscesses; misplaced adult teeth or retained baby teeth. We do recommend pain medication following dental extractions.

How can I keep my pet's teeth clean at home?
You may use a combination of techniques at home to help keep your pet's teeth clean: brushing, using cleaning gels and rinses, treats that are designed to help keep the teeth clean, and sometimes special foods designed to help prevent tartar formation. Talk to us about what the best regimen is for your pet!

New patients receive 15% OFF first visit.

Office Hours

Monday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Tuesday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Wednesday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Thursday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Friday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Saturday:

8:00 AM-12:00 PM

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Testimonials

  • "Dr DeChristina seems to have a real gift with felines and I enjoy taking my kitty Haley to see her when it's time for a yearly check-up. Thanks Dr D for your tender care!"
    Lucy H.

Featured Articles

  • Preparing for Your Kitten’s Developmental Milestones

    Need to hone in on your kitten knowledge? Check out the milestones your new pet will reach during its first year. ...

    Read More
  • What Is Ataxia in Dogs?

    Could balance or gait issues mean your dog has ataxia? ...

    Read More
  • Feline Ear Issues

    Most cats will never have a serious problem with their hearing during their lives. However, several ear issues can affect cats. Many of these can cause discomfort or pain, but some may even lead to a partial loss of hearing or deafness. Ear issues in cats can have a variety of causes, including infections, ...

    Read More
  • Fish

    If you’re thinking of getting a pet fish, you should know that your veterinarian has a lot of good advice about pet ownership. Fish can be very rewarding as pets, and you just may be surprised about how much fish actually interact with their owners. Here’s more valuable information about choosing ...

    Read More
  • Hypertension

    Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is fairly common in cats. Although it can occur on its own, it is usually a sign of other serious health problems. High blood pressure can also cause problems with other parts of the body, including the eyes, kidneys and heart. Cats are more likely to develop high ...

    Read More
  • Hyperthyroidism in Cats

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition that causes a cat’s thyroid gland to produce too much thyroid hormone. This disease most often shows up in middle-aged and older cats. The thyroid gland is located in the neck. Thyroid hormones affect most organs in the body, so hyperthyroidism can lead to other problems ...

    Read More
  • Kidney Issues

    The kidneys have two important roles in a cat’s body. First, they filter wastes and toxins from the blood, which then exit the body in the urine. The kidneys also help regulate the volume of fluids in the body and important hormones and other chemicals. Cats can develop several kinds of kidney issues, ...

    Read More
  • Liver

    The liver is a very important organ. It is involved in digestion and removing harmful toxins from the blood. Cats can develop several conditions that affect how well their liver works. Cholangiohepatitis One of the most common causes of liver disease in cats is cholangiohepatitis. In this condition, ...

    Read More
  • Nasal Problems

    Cats can suffer from several conditions of nose, sinuses and other parts of the upper respiratory tract. These include nasopharyngeal polyps—a type of non-cancerous growth—and inflammation of the membranes of the nasal passages and sinuses. Nasopharyngeal Polyps A nasopharyngeal polyp is a mass of ...

    Read More
  • Neurological Issues

    Did you know that your cat’s brain is the size of a golf ball? Despite its small size, a cat’s brain is complex and is an integral part of how a feline’s neurological system functions. If a cat has a defect or injury associated with the brain and the other organs, muscles, tissues and nerves that ...

    Read More
No form settings found. Please configure it.